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later when the nsa program has expanded so much. sideyou want allies on our , standing firm against islamic terrorism, after the president says the war is almost over -- i support the nsa program. we went through the nuances. apart from the isolationist the blameart from america first crowd in congress, one of the main reasons why we have a hard time maintaining support for programs such as the nsa is because the president has undercut us. he speaks in a schizophrenic way. he should be the one out there on national television. he should be the one of there, instead of talking about phony scandals, he should be talking about the speeches he has made about islamic terrorism and tell us why the nsa program is so important. [applause] we are up against a situation where people considered republicans or conservatives are defending a program of left of center president refuses to defend it himself. the country has to come first. that is why i believe a program such as the nsa, that as the basis for today's program, is so essential. let me talk about privacy versus security. menace of comm
>> coming up, concern growing over the expansion of nsa surveillance since the war on terror started. employees were spying on their lovers. the agency was spying on uniteded nations. and that's just what we found out over the weekend. we'll speak with a former agent turned whistleblower ahead. the conflict in syria may have reached a boiling point. secretary of state john kerry says he has no doubt they used chemical weapons on civilians. is intervention inevitable? and speaking of chemical weapons, a new report details how the u.s. once held saddam hussein and the iraqis with its chemical weapons attacks on iranian troops. ♪ tens of thousands gathered at the nation's capital this weekend in remembrance of the 1963 march on washington. even though the nation has come a very long way, many feel that the struggle for martin luther king's dream still continues. more on the sights and sounds later in today's show. it's monday, august 26. pam 5 p.m. in washington, d.c. the national security agency was once the most secretive organization in the u.s. now, hardly a day goes by wh
in place at the terrorist surveillance program that is now referred to as the nsa program, basically, what it did was it allowed us, and i am confident of the program we put in place and we have not been involved in the classified stuff -- but the program we put in place saved as general alexander has said at nsa must stop over 50 attacks on the united states and our friends overseas over the course of the last 10 or 12 years. we put in place the and enhanced interrogation program, waterboarding. some people so that was torture. i do not believe it was torture. ksm may have felt it was torture. the fact was that the enhanced interrogation program was signed off by the justice department using techniques we used on our and people in training, it was not torture, it was a good program that allowed us to develop the intelligence we needed to keep america safe for 7 1/2 years.[applause] and it worked. the record speaks for itself. the cia put out a classified report in 2004. ksm was subjected to enhanced interrogation. a report was published, classified by the cia, and it has been declassified
. of course, that's an issue in the forefront since nsa leaker snowden revealed the u.s. monitors u.s. domestic telephone. whether or not that program was used to uncover the latest threat, there's a platform for lawmakers who support and oppose the program. >> nsa program is proving its worth yet again. to reform the program, great. if you want to gut it, you make us much less safe and putting our nation at risk. >> i know senator graham said it shows that we need to continue the particular programs but if you look at the one most at issue here, that's the bulk meta data program, there's no indication unless i'm proved wrong later that program with vast amounts of domestic data, domestic telephoning data contributed to information about this particular plot. >> so again, we are going to see a number of embassies remaining closed after today. it's something that originally officials said could happen and go beyond sunday and just within the past hour or so, we have learned a number of these will be closed until saturday. >> okay. emily schmidt joining us from washington, we apprecia
to learn how much of your life the nsa knows about. here is a quick look what the fox affiliates are covering. fox 5 in atlanta, has the secretary that convinced yesterday's school shooting suspect to turn himself in. kcpq in washington has emotional testimony from afghan villagers, in the sentencing for the army soldier that murdered 16 civilians in afghanistan. and this is a live look from kttv in los angeles. big story, paparazzi lawsuit against musician kanye west for an alleged attack at lax. that's a live look from outside the belt for "special report." we will be right back. ♪ ♪ ♪ (vo) purina cat chow. 50 years of feeding great relationship >>> nsa surveillance on americans is a lot more extensive than first thought. that was the lead line to a couple of stories in recent weeks. tonight it fits again. two reports tonight. first, chief intelligence correspondent catherine herridge with some history. good evening. >> two years ago, national security court known as fisa court determined nsa collection violated statutes and constitutional protections. in a half dozen doc
's pass word, so i wouldn't be able to access those mess ages. >> so it would be up to nsa to crack them, if they had access to the emails. so is that what is going on here? the nsa is trying to get all of this information. but then it brings up a thought, why shut it down if they can still get it from you if you still have it? >> i'm walking a very fine line here without divulging what exactly transpired, but i was trying to prevent future transgressions. i have always been comfortable turning over to the government whatever information i have about a specific user. >> right. you have been subpoenaed on a few occasions, a couple of dozen subpoenas, and in those cases you didn't feel because there were individual people and there were reasons you granted those and -- and -- and -- you accepted the subpoenas and gave over the information. >> yeah, and going forward because i still have access to the data, i could be forced to do the same thing with a particular account. like i said before this was a question of access. should our federal government have access to private systems? to condu
with x because the nsa gets everything. in accordance with the law, much more difficult to read all three of those have serious implications. >> m's first point on this. we have seen response to the leaks, al qaeda affiliated groups seeking to change their tactics. looking to see what they can learn and change how they communicate to avoid detection. ofi think there's a lot mystery about what ntsd does and its role in the larger counterterrorism community. let's talk about some of the central roles that it has. one of the changes that happened on your watch, mike, was the calling of names for targeting killing moved from the national security council in the pentagon to being centralized. there's been a lot of controversy about that. to the extent you could talk about, what is the role in developing and calling the targeted killing? >> it is an accurate. >> not entirely. i will narrow it a bit. fundamentally, the criticism we heard from congress and elsewhere, eric and others wrote about this. that you had in theory, the cia had a "kill list," and there was another list and it did not matc
, who the hell has the time? we report it. you decide. >>> have you ever dated an nsa worker? before he seems into you, let's say he knows everything about you. could save you fifteen percent or more on car insurance. yep, everybody knows that. well, did you know some owls aren't that wise? don't forget i'm having brunch with meghan tomorrow. who? meghan, my coworker. who? seriously? you've met her like three times. who? (sighs) geico. fifteen minutes could save you...well, you know. ♪ the middle of this special moment and i need to run off to the bathroom. ♪ i'm fed up with always having to put my bladder's needs ahead of my daughter. ♪ so today, i'm finally talking to my doctor about overactive bladder symptoms. [ female announcer ] know that gotta go feeling? ask your doctor about prescription toviaz. one toviaz pill a day significantly reduces sudden urges and accidents, for 24 hours. if you have certain stomach problems or glaoma, or can not empty your bladd, you should not take toviaz. get emergency medical help right away if your face, lips, throat or tongue swells. toviaz
. it was the chairman of the judiciary committee, your colleague, senator leahy, who said wait a minute, i know the nsa tells us 54 plots in one way or another have been this wartded because of the program senator chambliss is refeing to, he says that's a bit of an joef statement, and he said it in open testimony this week. listen. >> open testimony is section 215 to thwart or prevent 54 terrorist plots. not by any stretch can you get 54 terrorist plots. this program is not effective. it has to end. so far i'm not convinced by what i've seen. >> do you agree with that? >> we had a meeting in the white house, saxby and i attended it with the president. there were about ten of us, democrats and republicans, from the house and the senate, and we spent an hour and a half in the president in the oval office, an hour and a half going over this nsa, debating it back and forth. the nsa 215 program that we're talking about here is a program on domestic surveillance. in other words, do we need to collect all of the phone records of all of the people living in america for five years so that if we're going to targ
in the wake of the nsa surveillance revelations. things are going down a little differently in great britain. chief intelligence correspondent catherine herridge has that story tonight. >> reporter: the guardian's editor says british authorities demanded edward snowden's material provided to them or destroyed, but the paper facing legal action if it didn't comply. hard files were destroyed under supervision, but other copies exist. >> they threatened us with strength, go to get all this material back and stop us writing about it. that's not something that would be possible in the united states. >> reporter: the new nsa controversy plays out as president obama's traditional supporters on the left are openly criticizing his administration. >> i think the white house lost credibility. >> reporter: aclu alleges they play word games, citing a document known as the intelligence directive. collecting data does not mean storing data in the traditional sense but rather retrieving and analyzing it. >> it has a bizarre definition to allow the nsa to obscure what's going on, even though they're saying a
does. whether nsa used one of its programs that's come under criticism, xkeystroke or prism of others, obviously we don't know. i can tell you going forward knowing there's a threat out there, these are exactly the kinds of programs that we should be using to gather data from a wide variety of sources. >> yes. >> to sift through it, to try to find those needles in the hay stack before they strike. >> thank you, ambassador bolton. we won't speculate on how the details came. we'll just be glad that it's being monitored. thanks for joining us. we are taking this very seriously. we're considering our coverage on the al qaeda terror threat all day on fox news. keep it here for all the latest breaking developments. kelly? >>> iran is swearing in its newly elected president. in a ceremony broadcast live on state television. change in power raising new questions now about the future of the country's nuclear program. gunner powell li connor powell live from our mideast bureau. what does it mean for us? >> reporter: iran's new president hasan rouhani was elected a month ago. he draws support fr
it is not a smoke screen to help the nsa. >> we critize them for doing too little and now critize for too much. the worldwide alert is warranted in this situation. >> last week the al-qaeda leader called for attacks. the second 14 minute tape was posted on the internet on friday and marks the 15 year anniversary of al-qaeda's first attack. the si multiapous embassy bombings in tanzanyia. and the focus of the terrorist threat remains in yemen and why the british and french closed the embassy in yemen for the coming days. >> thank you, gen. >> gen mentioned, the focus is on yemen and a known hot bed of activity for al-qaeda. >> it is short for al-qaeda in the araban peninsula. it is considered to be the most dangerous al-qaeda affiliate. it is blamed for several terrorist plots in the united states. and including the bombing attempt on an airliner on christmas day. another plot involving bombs described as printer cartridges. that was broken up thanks for a tip from saudi intelligence officials. they are thought to have influenced the fort hood shotter hassan that left 13 killed and dozens more
roughneck 36. who else thinks the recent terrace is based -- is just propaganda to justify the nsa spying program? let me throw that over to the panel. does anybody believe this could be a counterplay to justify what has been said and done about edward snowden? the first person to speak will get the floor. >> >> is this something that comes to mind. >> i want to go back to the u.s. at some point. it would be a clever way to do it. you can have a real threat and at the same time you can overreact. to make people understand it is not done by a big bad government that wants to control everything, but it is linked to a real threat and real issues and real interest from an american point of view. >> the europeans will be involved for their own interests. we should not criticize the u.s. for doing something we would like to do ourselves. >> france has been engaged in similar activities and may be gone a little bit further. maybe people were surprised by the scale they were. people i know said we know this was going on anyway. is that something that might have occurred to you, that what was reve
the nsa keeps tabs on us, but there's anger behind the escapes that we're not using this spy tools widely enough. the time quotes intelligence experts who say other government agencies want access to all the secret information the nsa selected. let's take you to the judge. senior judicial analyst, judge andrew napolitano. >> at first the government toldes when snowden made his initial revelations the only thing they captured was basic information, billing information,. who you called, when you called, how long you spoke. >> shepard: they lied to us. >> snowden and other nsa whistle-blowers, including one named thomas drake who has been on shows in this building, was prosecuted by the government, and the prosecution was thrown out. reveals the government does have the context of phone calls and e-mails and can read them. this morning we learn that other entities in the federal government are jealous that the nsa has this and they want it. but the dea revealed, the drug enforcement administration, it has received it. so, they have actually started criminal investigations based on informatio
. the administration has insisted that it needs the nsa and its spying programs to counter the terrorists. we need to be able to look at few indications and sometimes that means scooping up matt said... my e-mail subject lines and dates. the leaks.ay include aren't you concerned that if you dial back too far on those kind of programs that the terrorist groups you're talking about going to be able to plan freely and perhaps attack the united r its interests? >> it is baloney. we have approved the following of terrorist communications from overseas, even those communications that go into the united states. when it comes to phone calls of every single american, they do not need to keep tabs on everyone of us us and what we are doing in order to support a terrorist attack, -- toward a terrorist attack that has an overseas connection. if we want to be 100% safe from criminals we could just get the police to give us the power to tell us everything of what we do and to come up to every house at any time. that is not the way our freedom works. into this type of threat, i would rather see drones overseas t
.s. embassies. on friday president obama announced proposals to change the oversight and transparency of the nsa. speakers included congressman peter king who chairs the homeland security subcommittee on counterterrorism and intelligence, former new york times reporter judith miller and fox business network host john stossel. the event was cohosted by the manhattan institute, the weekly standard and the group concerned veterans for america. >> we want to thank you all for coming. i'm not normally intimidated when i speak at these events, but now that i didn't realize gunny sergeant duff was here, now i'm very worried. [laughter] it's great to have all of you. i also want to join in thanking those of you who serve for your service and to say how pleased i am that pete king and john stossel have agreed to be here and also judy miller and gary bernstein who will be joining us for the panel. pete, when i saw -- i saw pete in afghanistan, i was visiting with a couple of people looking around for about a week in late 2011, and pete had volunteered, reuped and gone to afghanistan then to help train the
to go on to the nsa, you won't do anything in syria even if they use poison attacks. >> those attacks are wrong. >> bill: but you're not going to do anything about it? >> i'll ask you, is it a false flag operation? what would you do? >> bill: n but if they are using gas i would definitely use airpower there. okay, nsa. i think most americans don't like the intrusion. you want to do away with the nsa. that's what dennis kucinich wants to abolish, the agency. >> absolutely. >> bill: what would you put in its place to monitor communications by terrorists all over the world? >> i'd mick sure that all the existing intelligence agencies were abiding by the law. >> bill: okay, okay. >> the nsa has become a rogue agency. >> bill: i don't have time. only have a minute. say we abolish the nsa. not going to happen, but say obama does it. what would you put in its place? >> we have existing intelligence agencies who could handle this. let's face it, most of this work is being done by internet providers. 91% of the internet traffic goes through this program. >> bill: you'd let the cia and fbi hand
new stories. >> inyou had concluding this one, jon, busted for buging? a new report says the nsa cracked videoconferencing system at u.n. and apparently that is not all. >>> plus jody arias is back before a judge. today we could learn when the retrial of the convicted killer's penalty phase will begin. >>> and there is talk about making an entrance? bandits storm a pawn shop. why what they got away with has police very worried. it is all happing right now. jon: good morning to you, with us today, is arthel neville. in for jenna lee. arthel: we'll start with this, jon. a-team of u.n. inspectors coming under sniper fire in damascus. a spokesman saying it happened while they were on their way to inspect the site where hundreds of people were killed in a reported chemical attack last week. for days syria wouldn't let the team go near the site. the government finally agreeing to allow the inspectors to visit that starting today but a senior u.s. official dismissed the offer as too late to be credible saying crucial evidence could have already been destroyed. leland vittert is live in
from russia granting asylum to n.s.a. leaker edward snowden. >> russia has stabbed us in the back and each day that snowden is allowed to roam free is another twist of the knife. >> schieffer: we'll hear from new york democrat chuck schumer and we'll talk with house budget committee chairman paul ryan. plus analysis from the "washington post's" dan balz, author of the new book "collision 2012." peggy noonan of the "wall street journal." barton gellman of "time" magazine and the "washington post." david sanger of the "new york times," and cbs news political director john dickerson. a lot to cover, but it's what we do on "face the nation." captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news in washington, "face the nation" with bob schieffer. >> schieffer: and good morning again. well, we're getting more details this morning on why the government has closed those 22 american diplomatic posts across the middle east and north africa, and why they are taking so seriously the threat of a possible al qaeda attack. the travel warning that the state department issued last week for americans travelin
asks about it, ti think te nsa could be defined as a scandal. going after the privacy issue, on going after american's information and looking at e-mails. every day, it's worse than we thought. i think glenn greenwald needs to be applauded for what he has done. >> by coaxing edward snowden to go to hong kong? >> who knew he was giving up his life basically to come forward because of his conscious. >> he has no idea what he's doing. >> he had no idea he'd end up in russia. >> go to hong kong, stay in an airport for three and a half week, then go to russia where i really have some freedom. >> manning got 35 years. if i was ed snowden, i'd start taking russian language courses. >> you're not suggesting that ed snowden has come out clean on this now that he's accepted asylum from the kgb. >> where is he going to go? >> stay in the united states and get tortured? >> tortured? water boarding? >> do you think manning was treated well? >> sure. oh, really? >> would you rather get 35 years in jail or go live in another country. >> hicks said i got a problem with the way we handle things in lib
putin. remember this image from back in june? say a little frosty you think between putin and obama? nsa leaker ed snowden has been granted asylum through vladmir putin in russia to remain there up through one year. it could be extended. perhaps after hanking out at the airport for a month 1/2. there are a lot of questions if a united states president and sit side by side with vladmir putin at a time when he granted american citizen, snowden asylum. that may not happen. at the same time the g20 summit will take place in st. petersburg, russia. we have all reason to think that will take place and there will be a moment where the president and vladmir putin will see each other and talk to each other and perhaps see a picture other than the one frozen in time. >> that will be interesting. bill: president obama speaking on the global terror threat for the first time to jay leno on late night. was the set after late-night talk show for the comments that have now closed 20 u.s. embassies? we'll debate that. >> the shooter questioning the victims. major nidal hasan with his opening statement th
on that coming up next. plus, the nsa leaker, edward snowden, is reportedly trying to make himself comfortable in russia, at the home of another expatriate american. but how is he going to eat and earn a living and what does this say about the white house? and what does the white house say about this? next. the postal service is critical to our economy. delivering mail, medicine and packages, yet they're closing thousands of offices, slashing service and want to layoff over 100,000 workers. the postal service is recording financial losses, but not for reasons you might think. the problem? a burden no other agency or company bears. a 2006 law that drains $5 billion a year from post office revenue while the postal service is forced to overpay billions more into federal accounts. congress created this problem, and congress can fix it. >>> ed snowden has a new place to stay in russia with a group of american expatriates. the word from the lawyer representing the fugitive surveillance leaker. and it seems we have our first look at snowden leaving the moscow airport. today russian television broad
latest on the nsa leaker and his life ahead. >> hi, there, mara. edward snowden has, it would appear, settled into his new russian life as quietly as he spent most of his almost six weeks ined is that transit zone inside moscow's airport. so quiet, in fact, that some paparazzi and journalists who were apparently stalking him all that time are calling it anticlimatic. the only information we're actually getting about snowden is coming from his lawyer anatoly kucherena. he found a place to stay, an undisclosed location in moscow. he is keen to learn the russian language and culture and looking, according to kucherena, for a job as a human rights activist. he's also giving up, apparently, on the idea of seeking asylum in any latin american country. that means that he's probably taking the advice of his father, lonnie snowden who told me in an interview we did on thursday from washington, d.c., that if he were his son, he would stay here in russia and make a life of it because it's a strong country, he said, that could resist extreme u.s. pressure to actually to hand his son over to face
next month. voters are angered i the allegations that the nsa targeted the massive spying program and the german government was complicit. the government is fighting back. >> germany's foreign intelligence service, ded, uses its installation in bavaria to survey the world. some of that information is shared with the national security agency from the u.s.. in parliament, a scandal. the social democrats want access. and it is the center-right that says that it was these social democrats who came up with the information sharing all they were in government. >> this agreement is based on a policy decision from the former chancellor and chief of staff. >> under chancellor gerhard schroeder, he was responsible for cord knitting the agencies. today he serves as the chief of a parliamentary group. this is seen as a campaign issue ahead of the general election next month. it cracks -- >> it is total hypocrisy for the spd to be outraged at the cooperation between the nsa and the dd. >> they say that the government is trying to dodge the implications. >> germany is one of the top arms exporte
. >> critics are refuting many claims the obama administration made by the nsa data collection program. that is leaving many worried about the security of their personal information and wondering whether or not the agency is playing by the rules. chief intelligence correspondent catherine herridge has more now from washington. hi, catherine. have we reach ad tipping. >> reporter: patti ann, according to aclu at least 20 pieces of legislation are being considered to modify the nsa program adding the white house continues to disappoint its base on the issue. >> i think the white house has lost credibility and i think the government generally has been operating with a deficit of trust in the area of surveillance for the past few years. they have been saying one thing publicly to congress and to the courts and turns out that quite another thing has been taking place behind closed doors. >> reporter: in the end the aclu alleges that the nsa plays word games under the set of rules known as the united states intelligence directive 18, collecting data only applies when the data is analyzed and
. it is the biggest hate crime hoax of the year. and nsa is not only spying on millions of americans but lots of time using expensive resources to keep track of their love lives. and a founding twist and a new department of defense training manual dedicates a extremist behavior is the same that wanted to overthrow british rule. we provide the exact individualization that your body needs. this labor day, don't invest in a mattress until you visit a sleep number store. once you experience it, there's no going back. oh, yeah! at our biggest sale of the year, every bed is on sale. queen mattresses now start at just $599. and through labor day only, save 50% on our limited edition memory foam mattress sets. only at a sleep number store. sleep number. comfort individualized. mayo? corn dogs? you are so outta here! aah! [ female announcer ] the complete balanced nutrition of great-tasting ensure. 24 vitamins and minerals, antioxidants, and 9 grams of protein. [ bottle ] ensure®. nutrition inharge™. >> brand new developments in the brutal beating death of a world war ii vet rap. 88-year-old dell better be
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of the world. the nsa program is proving its worth yet again. but we need to reevaluate where we're at in light of these threats. sequestration has to be fixed. if this happens a year from now, intelligence community and military will be less capable. afrikom needs to be beefed up. that's where the war is going. we're about to withdraw from afghanistan. i don't want afghanistan to become iraq where we withdraw our troops and the terrorists come back. i appreciate what the administration is doing. they're taging the right approach to this. benghazi was a complete failure. the threats were real there. the reporting was real. and we basically dropped the ball. we've learned from benghazi, thank god, and the administration is doing this right. >> let me ask you, when you look at this map of u.s. embassies that are closed or consulates or missions, 22 of them, most of them across the muslim world, when you hear this global warning to all americans to take care, what do you think that says if the mission is to terrorize. in some sense, you feel like they've already won. >> it is a balance. shutting d
the terror warnings as a way to divert attention away from other issues, particularly the nsa leaks. are they right, or is the administration simply responding to threats that actually exist? >> well, i think the obama administration has a fair amount more credibility. the bush problem was this ridiculous orange, red, yell, orange, red, yellow and making a big deal about that every day, which the obama people properly abandoned. look, you have to react to what the intelligence is finding. the intelligence clearly gave a credible warning. if you don't react to that and you're the president of the united states, then the death of americans is on your shoulders. so of course he's going to react. of course he's going to close embassies if he feels they're at risk. the most ridiculous thing about the republican posturing is after all the fuss they put up about benghazi, you'd be suspecting maybe they'd support the president when he tried to make sure that didn't happen again. >> well, and it's not necessarily a partisan issue. i mean, if you look at the recent polls, there are skeptics o
database which is different than they nsa record and that pass them along to agents in the field. while this is perfectly acceptable, probably acceptable, to pass along the tips, what happens next raises questions. the agency has been instructed to create something called parallel construction. that is once they make a case, they act as if they never got the information. they might get a tip that a drug dealer will be in a certain place at a certain time. when an agent will follow a car and, they will make a pre textual traffic stop. they will find drugs inside but the only reason they need to follow the car is from the tip. the agents and the police and the field must recreate their investigative reports. they are supposed to leave out any trace that they got this tip from special operations. the problem with that say some critics is that that means the defendant will not have access to certain information that is part of their constitutional right to a fair trial. host: when it comes up in court, how is it explained by the agents? guest: the agent might be asked how this investigation
gamut. andas been counsel to nsa acting assistant director for national security and special counsel to the fbi director. his predecessor's michael leiter. he was the second director of the counterterrorism center until 2011. he is now senior counsel to the ceo of data analytics company. he is also a national security analyst for nbc news. with a very begin is, whatstion and that is the current state of the threat from terrorism? were does the emulate from and how serious is it? what do we start with it is great to be here. it is daunting to talk about it every would've talked about a lot of subjects today. i will give it a shot. topuld say right off of the the threat is very different now for what it was 10 years ago and even 4 years ago. thinking at a couple of different levels. as have been noted, the threat from al qaeda and afghanistan is really significantly degrading. we do not face the same rate as the same attack as 9/11. the group is really struggling to survive to recruit and train and operate. -- it remains at the vanguard of the movement. is still looks to for leadership
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 141 (some duplicates have been removed)